Archive for the ‘ Stories ’ Category

Wright’s Law: A Unique Teacher Imparts Real Life Lessons

The Frog in the Milk Pail

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A little frog was hopping around the farmyard. He was looking for good things to eat. He found wonderfully juicy flies buzzing around the pig pen. “Gulp! Gulp!” Gone.

Then, he ate some delicious crunchy spiders that hung from webs behind the feed trough. “Gulp! Gulp!” Gone.

He saw a mosquito flying by and reached out with his long sticky tongue and grabbed it. “Slurp,” went his tongue. “Gulp! Gulp!” Gone.

As the little frog ate he explored new places. He saw a cricket hop into the milk shed. The cricket hopped through the door. So, the frog hopped through the door.

The cricket hopped up onto the milk stool. So, the frog hopped up on the milk stool. The cricket hopped up to the table top, and the frog hopped up to the table top. The cricket hopped to the window ledge, and the frog hopped to the window ledge. The cricket hopped out the window. But the frog fell, “SPLASH!” right into the milk pail.

The pail was filled half way with fresh milk. The level of the milk was too low for him to reach the top of the pail. The sides of the pail were high, and he could not climb out. The frog kicked, and he swam in circles until he became tired. He tried to close his eyes just to rest for a few seconds, but he sank to the bottom of the pail where his nostrils filled with milk. He could not breathe.

He used his legs to push off the bottom and kicked with all his might until he came to the surface again. He was so afraid, and he was so tired. He just wanted to rest. But every time, he quit kicking, he sank into the milk again and started to drown.

The frog did not give in to his fear or his tired legs. He kicked and he kicked and he kicked and he kicked.

Then, something strange happened. The milk began to turn thicker around him. At first, this make kicking even harder. The thickened milk tried to suck him to the bottom of the pail. It was harder than even to swim and to kick. But, still the frog would not give up.

Finally, the milk turned thick enough that the frog could stand on top of it instead of sinking in. The milk had been turned into butter through all the kicking and turning and churning of the frog. The frog was able to climb out to safety and to return to his family.

Lesson:

When your life gets really tough.

When you think you’ve had enough

When the world works you to death

Just try to take a big deep breath

Try so hard before you rest

Keep on working, do your best

Don’t give until you’re done.

Don’t give up until you’ve won.

Never Give Up!

Why Man Lives Eighty Years

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When the creator made the world, he wanted to give each person and each animal thirty years to live. He told man, “You will rule over all of my creatures!” You will be young, healthy, handsome, strong and wise!” You will live for thirty years, the same as the animals you watch over.”

It must have seemed wonderful to man to be able to rule over the creatures on the earth. But, he was not happy about only having thirty years to live.

After creating man, God created the donkey. “Donkey,” God said, “You will eat unappetizing food and never be full. You will work for man and carry his heavy loads. People and animals will make fun of you.”

“God,” begged the donkey, “I don’t want to suffer. May I only live ten years instead of thirty?”

Man heard the donkey. “God?” he asked. “May I have the twenty years the Donkey does not want?”

God granted his request but said, “You will use those extra years just as the donkey would have used them.” Man agreed since this would allow him to live to be 50 years old.

Then God created the dog. “You will have to defend everything around you,” God said to the dog. “You will always sense danger even when it is far away from you and bark at everything around you. You will never get enough rest. You will always do more for others than they do for you, and you will always seek to please the men who own you during your thirty years.”

“God, said the dog, “If my life will be so hard, please let me live ten years instead of thirty.”

Man hear the dog’s request and asked God for the twenty years the dog did not want. God granted his request but said, “You will have to to live those extra twenty years just as the dog would have lived them.” Man agreed because he would now be able to live 70 years instead of only fifty.

Then God created the monkey. “You will look like man,” God told the momkey. But, you won’t live like man. YOu will climb trees and jump from branch to branch. You will often act silly and imitate what you see around you in your thirty years.”

“God,” said the monley, “If I must act so silly, I don’t want to live for thirty years. Twenty is enough for me.” Again, man heard and asked for the extra ten years.

God gave the extra years to man, but told him that he would have to live those extra ten years just as the monkey would have lived them.

Man was happy with the extra years the creator gave to him. He lived his life just as God said he would. For the first thirty years of his life man is young and handsome. He is strong and rules over all of God’s creatures on the earth. This is the time most men marry and have children of their own.

Then from thirty to fifty, man begins to worry about acquiring things. He works like a donkey and feels like he can never collect enough of everything around him. From fifty to seventy, man lives more like a dog. He guards the things he has collected. He doesn’t sleep as well and sees dangers all around him. Sometimes, he barks at others without reason. He feels insecure and unprotected.

From seventy to eighty, man’s hands shake. His legs bend. His eyes cannot see well, and he cannot hear as well. His mind begins to wear out and he begins to act silly, just like a monkey. He sometimes even imitates others without knowing why.

Things I Learned..

All I ever learned from a dog
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1. Never pass up the opportunity to go for a joy ride.
2. Allow the experience of fresh air and the wind in your face to be pure ecstasy.
3. When loved ones come home, always run to greet them.
4. When it’s in your best interest, always practice obedience.
5. Let others know when they’ve invaded your territory.
6. Take naps and always stretch before rising.
7. Run, romp, and play daily.
8. Eat with gusto and enthusiasm.
9. Be loyal.
10. Never pretend to be something you’re not.
11. If what you want lies buried, dig until you find it.
12. When someone is having a bad day, be silent, sit close by and nuzzle them gently.
13. Delight in the simple joy of a long walk.
14. Thrive on attention and let people touch you.
15. Avoid biting when a simple growl will do.
16. On hot days, drink lots of water and lie under a shady tree.
17. When you are happy, dance around and wag your entire body.
18. No matter how often you are criticized, don’t buy into the guilt thing and pout. Run right back and make friends

*****
ALL I REALLY NEED TO KNOW I LEARNED FROM NOAH’S ARK

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• Plan ahead. It wasn’t raining when Noah built the ark.
• Stay fit. When you’re 600 years old, someone might ask you to do something REALLY big.
• Don’t listen to critics, do what has to be done.
• Build on high ground.
• For safety’s sake, travel in pairs.
• Two heads are
than one.
• Speed isn’t always an advantage. The cheetahs were on board, but so were the snails.
• If you can’t fight or flee, float!
• Take care of your animals as if they were the last ones on earth.
• Don’t forget that we’re all in the same boat.
• When the doo-doo gets really deep, don’t sit there and complain shovel!!!
• Stay below deck during the storm.
• Remember that the ark was built by amateurs and the Titanic was built by professionals.
• If you have to start over, have a friend by your side.
• Remember that the woodpeckers INSIDE are often a bigger threat than the storm outside.
• Don’t miss the boat. No matter how bleak it looks, there’s always a rainbow on the other side.

God Scent

Heaven Scent

Smell the Rain…….

A cold March wind danced around the dead of night in Dallas as the doctor walked into the small hospital room of Diana Blessing. Still groggy from surgery, her husband David held her hand as they braced themselves for the latest news.

That afternoon of March 10, 1991, complications had forced Diana, only 24-weeks pregnant, to undergo an emergency cesarean to deliver the couple’s new daughter, Danae Lu Blessing. At 12 inches long and weighing only one pound and nine ounces, they already knew she was perilously premature. Still, the doctor’s soft words dropped like bombs.

“I don’t think she’s going to make it,” he said, as kindly as he could. “There’s only a 10-percent chance she will live through the night, and even then, if by some slim chance she does make it, her future could be a very cruel one.”

Numb with disbelief, David and Diana listened as the doctor described the devastating problems Danae would likely face if she survived. She would never walk. She would never talk. She would probably be blind. She would certainly be prone to other catastrophic conditions from cerebral palsy to complete mental retardation. And on and on.

“No! No!” was all Diana could say. She and David, with their 5-year-old son Dustin, had long dreamed of the day they would have a daughter to become a family of four. Now, within a matter of hours, that dream was slipping away.

Through the dark hours of morning as Danae held onto life by the thinnest thread, Diana slipped in and out of drugged sleep, growing more and more determined that their tiny daughter would live and live to be a healthy, happy young girl. But David, fully awake and listening to additional dire details of their daughter’s chances of ever leaving the hospital alive, much less healthy, knew he must confront his wife with the inevitable.

“David walked in and said that we needed to talk about making funeral arrangements,” Diana remembers “I felt so bad for him because he was doing everything, trying to include me in what was going on, but I just wouldn’t listen, I couldn’t listen. I said, “No, that is not going to happen, no way! I don’t care what the doctors say Danae is not going to die!

One day she will be just fine, and she will be coming home with us!”

As if willed to live by Diana’s determination, Danae clung to life hour after hour, with the help of every medical machine and marvel her miniature body could endure But as those first days passed, a new agony set in for David and Diana. Because Danae’s underdeveloped nervous system was sentially “raw,” every lightest kiss or caress only intensified her discomfort- so they couldn’t even cradle their tiny baby girl against

their chests to offer the strength of their love. All they could do, as Danae struggled alone beneath the ultra-violet light in the tangle of tubes and wires, was to pray that God would stay close to their precious little girl.

There was never a moment when Danae suddenly grew stronger. But as weeks went by, she did slowly gain an ounce of weight here and an ounce of strength there.

At last, when Danae turned two months old, her parents were able to hold her in their arms for the very first time. And two months later-though doctors continued to gently but grimly warn that her chances of surviving,much less living any kind of normal life, were next to zero – Danae went home from the hospital, just as her mother had predicted.

Today, five years later, Danae is a petite but feisty young girl with glittering gray eyes and an unquenchable zest for life. She shows no signs, whatsoever, of any mental or physical impairments. Simply, she is everything a little girl can be and more-but that happy ending is far from the end of her story.

One blistering afternoon in the summer of 1996 near her home in Irving, Texas, Danae was sitting in her mother’s lap in the bleachers of a local ball park where her brother Dustin’s baseball team was practicing. As always, Danae was chattering non-stop with her mother and several other adults sitting nearby when she suddenly fell silent.

Hugging her arms across her chest, Danae asked, “Do you smell that?”. Smelling the air and detecting the approach of a thunderstorm, Diana replied, “Yes, it smells like rain.” Danae closed her eyes and again asked, “Do you smell that?” Once again, her mother replied, “Yes, I think we’re about to get wet. It smells like rain.”

Still caught in the moment, Danae shook her head, patted her thin shoulders with her small hands and loudly announced, “No, it smells like Him. It smells like God when you lay your head on His chest.”

Tears blurred Diana’s eyes as Danae then happily hopped down to play with the other children. Before the rains came her daughter’s words confirmed what Diana and all the members of the extended Blessing family had known, at least in their hearts, all along.

During those long days and nights of her first two months of her life when her nerves were too sensitive for them to touch her, God was holding Danaeon His chest- and it is His loving scent that she remembers so well.

_
Unknown

Dance Like No One’s Watching

We convince ourselves that life
will be better after we get married,
have a baby, then another.
Then we are frustrated that the kids aren’t old enough
and we’ll be more content when they are.

After that we’re frustrated that we
have teenagers to deal with,
we will certainly be happy
when they are out of that stage.

We tell ourselves that our life will be complete
when our spouse gets his or her act together,
when we get a nicer car,
are able to go on a nice vacation,
when we retire.
The truth is there’s no better time
to be happy than right now.
If not now, when?

Your life will always be filled with challenges.
It’s best to admit this to yourself
and decide to be happy anyway.
One of my favorite quotes comes
from Alfred D Souza.

He said, “For a long time it had seemed
to me that life was about to begin -real life.
But there was always some obstacle in the way,
something to be gotten through first,
some unfinished business,
time still to be served,
a debt to be paid. Then life would begin.
At last it dawned on me that these
obstacles were my life.”

This perspective has helped me to see
that there is no way to happiness.
Happiness is the way,
so, treasure every moment that you have.
And treasure it more because you shared it
with someone special,
special enough to spend your time…
and remember that time waits for no one.

So stop waiting until you finish school,
until you go back to school,
until you lose ten pounds,
until you gain ten pounds,
until you have kids,
until your kids leave the house,
until you start work,
until you retire,
until you get married,
until you get divorced,
until Friday night,
until Sunday morning,
until you get a new car or home,
until your car or home is paid off,
until spring, until summer,
until fall, until winter,
until you are off welfare,
until the first or fifteenth,
until your song comes on,
until you’ve had a drink,
until you’ve sobered up,
until you die, until you are born again
to decide that there is no better time
than right now to be happy…
Happiness is a journey, not a destination.

So, Work like you don’t need money.
Love like you’ve never been hurt and
Dance Like no one’s watching.

_
Author Unknown

Rocks and Sand

A philosophy professor stood before his class and had some items in
front of him. When class began, wordlessly he picked up a large
empty mayonnaise jar and proceeded to fill it with rocks, rocks
about 2″ in diameter.

He then asked the students if the jar was full. They agreed that it was.
So the professor then picked up a box of pebbles and poured them
into the jar. He shook the jar lightly. The pebbles, of course,
rolled into the open areas between the rocks.

He then asked the students again if the jar was full. They agreed it was.

The students laughed. The professor picked up a box of sand and
poured it into the jar. Of course, the sand filled up everything else.

“Now,” said the professor, “I want you to recognize that this is
your life. The rocks are the important things – your family, your
partner, your health, your children – anything that is so important
to you that if it were lost, you would be nearly destroyed.

“The pebbles are the other things that matter like your job, your
house, your car.

“The sand is everything else. The small stuff.

“If you put the sand into the jar first, there is no room for the
pebbles or the rocks. The same goes for your life. If you spend
all your energy and time on the small stuff, you will never have
room for the things that are important to you.

“Pay attention to the things that are critical to your happiness.
Play with your children. Take time to get medical checkups. Take your
partner out dancing. There will always be time to go to work, clean
the house, give a dinner party and fix the disposal.

“Take care of the rocks first – the things that really matter. Set
your priorities. The rest is just sand.”

(You can do this as a demonstration in front of teens as a lesson)